• Abbey Baldacchino

How to Write a Great Job Ad

The key to capturing great candidates online is creating an equally great job ad.

Sounds easy, right? But if it was, we wouldn't be writing this blog.


There a few things you need to nail in order to create a job ad that is succinct, attractive and approachable. Here's what we suggest...


  1. It all starts with the header. Create a strong and specific headline that will attract a smaller pool of quality candidates. Ensure it includes a clear introduction to what you're new employee is in for, depending on your platform this will include the title and a few words to add attraction.

  2. Be honest. For a candidate, the worst scenario is signing on with a company you love the external look of and realising internally it's nothing like that. This situation leads to high turnover and having to repeat the tiring hiring process. Instead, be straight up! Make sure you present exactly what the candidate will be getting (without scaring them off). Be honest about the attractions too! This may include paternal leave, an in-house barista, monthly social events, etc. ... just make sure you stick to your word.

  3. The most important part: Job Description. The guts of the piece, the place we all immediately scroll to...the job description. Make sure this is as clear as possible, throw out any once of ambiguity. Candidates want to know exactly what they're applying for, so write out a super transparent list of all their proposed responsibilities and make sure you get them all; you don't want an employee unhappily coming to you in 6 months when they're handed a mountain of tasks outside their job description.

  4. Qualifications and experience. For this, we suggest making two separate lists: a need and a want list. In the 'need' state the minimum qualifications, you require a candidate to have before they're even considered. In the 'want' list extra qualification you really desire your candidate to have. We all know that the qualifications listed aren't always a deal-breaker and so do your candidates, meaning you're bound to have applicants who don't fit the bill. Explicitly outlining the bare minimum you need, you're likely to turn away candidates who don't meet that requirement.

  5. Discuss the Corporate Culture. The working environment is a huge part of any role so it's best your candidate knows what they're in for before even applying. Some people might not be excited for a WFH workplace that only meets once a week, whereas others might turn their nose up at the thought of a super social workplace. Let them make an educated choice and decide if they're the right fit for your company.

  6. Call to action. Let candidates know what they need to do to apply. This may seem like an obvious one, but some people don't get it right. Include specifics on what you expect which could include a Resume, Cover Letter, Video Interview, Portfolio, Previous Stats, etc. Instead of letting them guess what extra documentation they may need to include.


Now that you're fully equipped, get writing! Go and hire your dream team... and if you need any help, we're only a call away!

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